FAITH AND LOGIC—STRANGE BEDFELLOWS

In Glenn Beck’s semi-biographic, Being George Washington, he paints a historical picture of the role God’s hand played in the birth of the greatest nation this world has ever known. For those with a more secular bent, the fortuitous climate changes at critical junctures that helped the rebels ascend to freedom were random acts of nature, a flip of the coin. Faith defies, or defines logic, depending on your viewpoint. A secular progressive would consider the two incompatible. For the purpose of this discussion, I’m asking you, the skeptic, to hypothesize that faith is more than smoke and mirrors, voodoo, or superstition.

For me, the re-election of President Obama defied all logic. We have a declining economy, a situation worse (in my opinion) than we faced in the 1970s under Carter, when the American people fired him and voted in Ronald Reagan. Yet now, the electorate chose to stay the course, spurning a man with a demonstrated expertise in matters economic and prior experience in reversing financial misfortune. In fact, one of the worst “acts of God” we’ve seen in this country, hurricane Sandy, nipped Romney’s surge in the bud. To the secular progressive it is a validation of their ideology over faith—or is it?

Under the faith hypothesis, Obama’s re-election signifies that, if God is still with us, the course we’re on is the right one, the economy will recover, the debt will melt, and the unemployed will return to their jobs. On the other hand, if, as in the time of Noah, God has given up on us, the result could be interpreted to mean that He is allowing us to proceed unhindered to our destruction. So, those of us that cannot fathom how continuing down this path could possibly represent the road to recovery are doomed to mourn our abandonment and cast about for an ark of salvation.

Still, I cannot in my wildest imaginings believe that the bad behavior that has weakened our country and left trillions of dollars of debt for our children and grandchildren has been sanctioned by a higher power. If we accept the premises that the preceding statement is valid and that God has not given up on the human race, logic leads to the inevitable conclusion that Romney’s election would have been harmful to the nation. Perhaps his attempt to change the course of the country would have failed, fatally delaying the awakening of the nation to the idea that nothing short of radical change can save us. Secular progressives would call this tortured logic.

I call it faith.

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6 Responses to “FAITH AND LOGIC—STRANGE BEDFELLOWS”

  1. Ira Says:

    Your faith logic is exactly the same as the radical islamist yelling “it is god’s will” right before he blows up somebody (hopefully only himself).

    Also, as I explained previously, Obama did not defy logic and win because of his economic policies, he won despite them.

  2. David Says:

    You’re first point speaks to the moral relativism I’ve addressed in prior posts, accounting for the confusion that weakens those seeking to fight Islamism. Your second point, if true, both heartens and disturbs me. It means liberals understand we’re going down the wrong economic path but don’t understand we’re going down with it.

  3. Ira Says:

    My first point speaks only to your logic. My second point is not that those who voted for Obama (note that I didn’t say liberals) think he is pointing down the wrong economic path, only that his economic policies lacked coherence and were not the reason for his support. My point, to be more explicit, is that in this election the pundits much quoted “it’s the economy, stupid” didn’t hold… the majority voted against the political polarization and regressive social agenda that they have decided is mostly the fault of the Republican party’s surrender to the tea baggers. Obama was the benefactor of this phenomenon.

  4. David Says:

    I have ro agree that the left so successfully vilified the right that an electorate still unaware of the depth of the economic malaise voted to continue down a path of inevitable decline. There was a time when groups touting fiscal sobriety were considered mainstream; now they are radical and reactionary. I am very much in favor of moving the social agenda issues off the national stage and returning them to the states. It may be our last hope for turning this around, if there is still time to forestall a recession.

  5. Ira Says:

    Vilification, such as there was, was self-inflicted.

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